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Tackling Taipa.

Exploring Macau's Islands.Trees, trees and more trees.

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The former Lec Long Fire Cracker Factory, Taipa, Macau.

The former Lec Long Fire Cracker Factory, Taipa, Macau.

My plans for today were a bit vague. I was thinking of exploring Coloane Village. Peter was in two minds about joining me. We googled getting there and it seemed to take much longer than I remember and buses didn't seem to go very near it. I'm fairly sure that information is not correct, but it was enough to put us off. In the end I decided I would look at Taipa Village instead and Peter decided he didn't want to come.

Taipa is an island located about two and a half kilometres south of Mainland Macau. At one time Taipa was actually two different islands: Greater Taipa and Lesser Taipa. Over time these two islands became joined together through siltation and land reclamation. The parts that were the original islands are quite hilly and the central reclaimed area is flat. Nowadays Taipa is also joined onto Coloane Island which used to be a separate island to the south. The area that was once the sea is now the Cotai Strip where all the fancy hotels are located.

Taipa was first settled by Chinese fishermen around eight hundred years ago. Much later in the 1920's Taipa became a popular place for the production of firecrackers. At one time Taipa was only accessible by boat. The first bridge linking it to Peninsular Macau was built in 1974. This encouraged more people to settle here. Nowadays Taipa is linked to Mainland Macau by several bridges. It is mainly a residential area, but it still has several interesting places to visit.

I wanted to have another look at The Taipa Houses Museum. I have not been there for many years. To get there I got on bus 33 on the opposite side of the road from our hotel and got off at Piscinas Do Carma.

From the bus stop I should have walked slightly back the way then headed up a slope on my right, but I was attracted by some interesting looking buildings ahead of me on the other side of the road, so I went there first. I had never seen them before. They turned out to be the remains of an old firecracker factory called Iec Long Firecracker Factory.

At one time Macau had five fireworks factories. Most of these were located on Taipa, as not so many people lived there and fireworks factories had been known to explode. The Iec Long Firecracker Factory was established in 1925 and provided many people with jobs. However, the firecracker industry eventually began to decline and this factory closed down in 1984. It was not fully demolished and is now considered to be the best preserved industrial heritage site on Macau. Personally I really loved it. It has lots of ruined buildings, many overgrown with trees.

Gates of the Iec Long Firecracker Factory.

Gates of the Iec Long Firecracker Factory.

Welcome sign at the entrance.

Welcome sign at the entrance.

Former firecrackers factory building.

Former firecrackers factory building.

Former firecrackers factory building.

Former firecrackers factory building.

Former firecrackers factory building.

Former firecrackers factory building.

Former firecrackers factory building.

Former firecrackers factory building.

Former firecrackers factory building.

Former firecrackers factory building.

Former firecrackers factory building.

Former firecrackers factory building.

Former firecrackers factory building.

Former firecrackers factory building.

Former firecrackers factory building.

Former firecrackers factory building.

Former firecrackers factory building.

Former firecrackers factory building.

Former firecrackers factory building.

Former firecrackers factory building.

Trees, trees and more trees.

Trees, trees and more trees.

The trees are taking over.

The trees are taking over.

The trees are taking over.

The trees are taking over.

There was also a large reflective pond. It's quite beautiful here. There were information boards outside all of the buildings explaining what they were once used for.

Looking at the pond.

Looking at the pond.

Reflective pond.

Reflective pond.

Reflective pond.

Reflective pond.

Reflective pond.

Reflective pond.

In addition there was an attractive Chinese New Year display with a golden dragon and trees of spring blossom. Luckily for me these had not been dismantled yet.

Chinese New Year Dragon.

Chinese New Year Dragon.

Chinese New Year Blossom.

Chinese New Year Blossom.

Upside down teddy.

Upside down teddy.

After looking around this old factory, I doubled back and headed towards the Taipa Houses Museum. I again diverted - I'm easily led astray - and visited the nearby Our Lady of Carmel Church first.

Our Lady of Carmel Church.

Our Lady of Carmel Church.

Building opposite Our Lady of Carmel Church.

Building opposite Our Lady of Carmel Church.

Our Lady of Carmel Church from a different angle.

Our Lady of Carmel Church from a different angle.

Our Lady of Carmel Church was built in 1885. It stands on a hill overlooking the historic Taipa Village. Many people come here and to Taipa Village to take their wedding photos. I couldn't go inside the church, as unfortunately it was closed.

Wedding Day Poses, Taipa, Macau.

Wedding Day Poses, Taipa, Macau.

Next I walked back down the hill to the historic Taipa Village Houses. The Taipa Village Houses are five pastel green Portuguese style houses located along the Avenida de Praia. These houses were built in 1921 and were used as residences for senior civil servants. They were converted into a museum in 1999 and were revitalised again in 2016. They seemed much livelier than when I had visited before. Apparently they have some cultural events here from time to time, too.

Avenida Da Praia.

Avenida Da Praia.

This house is now a museum.

This house is now a museum.

Looking out from the front porch.

Looking out from the front porch.

This house is the shop.

This house is the shop.

This house was closed.

This house was closed.

More weddings.

More weddings.

Houses in a row.

Houses in a row.

A house from a different angle.

A house from a different angle.

Seating area at the end of the houses. I think this is sometimes used for entertainment.

Seating area at the end of the houses. I think this is sometimes used for entertainment.

I was able to go inside two of the buildings. One had been converted into a shop and the other was furnished in its original style. It was interesting to wander around. There is no entry charge.

The living-room.

The living-room.

A second living-room.

A second living-room.

The study.

The study.

The dining-room.

The dining-room.

The dining-room.

The dining-room.

The kitchen.

The kitchen.

Stairway.

Stairway.

One of the bedrooms.

One of the bedrooms.

Shrine in the bedroom.

Shrine in the bedroom.

The other bedroom.

The other bedroom.

Paintings in the bedroom.

Paintings in the bedroom.

Painting in the bedroom.

Painting in the bedroom.

The bathroom.

The bathroom.

At one time these houses would have been on the sea. The ponds that are now in front of them have been made into a kind of nature reserve and bird watching area. At certain times of the year there are many water lilies here.

Map of the ponds conservation area.

Map of the ponds conservation area.

The Taipa houses viewed across the pond.

The Taipa houses viewed across the pond.

The Taipa houses viewed across the pond.

The Taipa houses viewed across the pond.

The Taipa houses viewed across the pond.

The Taipa houses viewed across the pond.

Bird sculpture on the ponds.

Bird sculpture on the ponds.

Greenery on the ponds.

Greenery on the ponds.

Wandering the walkway.

Wandering the walkway.

While wandering around I found a beautiful bird themed staircase. As well as mosaic images of birds on the steps, it also had little models of kingfishers.

Bird themed staircase.

Bird themed staircase.

Bird themed staircase.

Bird themed staircase.

There's also a nearby funicular where people can go up for views. I think this is new, as I have never seen it before. I didn't really have time to do this, plus it was a very foggy day, so not ideal for views. Next time.

The new funicular.

The new funicular.

On the far side of all the ponds is the Cotai Strip with all its swanky hotels. It's all quite incongruous - historical Portuguese buildings on one side, fake Houses of Westminster, Doge's Palace and the Eiffel Tower on the other.

Looking towards the Cotai Strip.

Looking towards the Cotai Strip.

Looking towards the Cotai Strip.

Looking towards the Cotai Strip.

Wandering the walkway.

Wandering the walkway.

There was a park between the village and the church. It had a quite uniquely shaped fountain.

Uniquely shaped fountain.

Uniquely shaped fountain.

Uniquely shaped fountain.

Uniquely shaped fountain.

In the park I climbed a stairway up to a statue of Luís de Camões, the famous Portuguese poet who once lived in Macau.

Luís de Camões.

Luís de Camões.

Luís de Camões.

Luís de Camões.

Luís de Camões.

Luís de Camões.

Luís de Camões.

Luís de Camões.

Path down from here.

Path down from here.

There were beautiful views over Our Lady of Carmel Church from here and colourful flowers everywhere.

Views over Our Lady of Carmel from the park.

Views over Our Lady of Carmel from the park.

I decided to head down into modern day Taipa Village. This is much more beautiful than I remember it. I think it has all been done up. There are lots and lots of beautiful colourful buildings.

Colourful buildings.

Colourful buildings.

Colourful buildings.

Colourful buildings.

Lamp posts and shutters.

Lamp posts and shutters.

Mellow Yellow.

Mellow Yellow.

Colourful alleyway.

Colourful alleyway.

Colours and flowers.

Colours and flowers.

Moody Blues.

Moody Blues.

There were several different paths in the village that led to Our Lady of Carmel Church and the Taipa Village Houses.

Route to Taipa Village Houses and the church.

Route to Taipa Village Houses and the church.

Route to Taipa  Village Houses and the church.

Route to Taipa Village Houses and the church.

There were also lots of Chinese temples here. The first temple I came across was the Buddhist temple of I Leng. This was built in 1900 and is dedicated to the great emperor of healing. It is a temple dedicated to doctors and healers.

The I Leng Temple.

The I Leng Temple.

Inside the temple.

Inside the temple.

The second nearby temple was the Temple of Kun Iam, goddess of mercy which dates from the early twentieth century.

The Temple of Kun Iam.

The Temple of Kun Iam.

Inside the temple.

Inside the temple.

The biggest temple I came across was the Pak Tai Temple, which is around a hundred and sixty years old. Pak Tai is the northern emperor and is believed to have the divine powers to withstand fire and floods, this he protects people from natural disasters.

Pak Tai Temple.

Pak Tai Temple.

Pak Tai Temple.

Pak Tai Temple.

Inside the temple.

Inside the temple.

Inside the temple.

Inside the temple.

There were also lots of examples of colourful street art.

Street art

Street art

Street art.

Street art.

Street art.

Street art.

Street art.

Street art.

Street art.

Street art.

Street art

Street art

Street art.

Street art.

Street art.

Street art.

Street art.

Street art.

Street art

Street art

I had a wander around Feira do Carmo, Taipa Village's market square, which dates from 1886. The famous Rua da Cunha Food Street is near here. I think I crossed it, but I don't think I walked down it. Truth be told I forgot about it. Oops!

Market square.

Market square.

Market square.

Market square.

Market square.

Market square.

Market square.

Market square.

Market square.

Market square.

Market square.

Market square.

Taipa Village is famous for food and there are lots of places to eat and drink. I really don't think I did this village justice. I could have spent much more time wandering all its alleyways.

Colourful Restaurant.

Colourful Restaurant.

Pinocchio Restaurant.

Pinocchio Restaurant.

Seafood Restaurant.

Seafood Restaurant.

Restaurant.

Restaurant.

Alma Restaurant.

Alma Restaurant.

I found a bus stop and realised the 33 bus does a circular route and I could have got on it anywhere and still ended up back at my hotel. Travelling on this bus was like a tour of Taipa. It seemed to go just about everywhere.

Back in the hotel we headed to afternoon tea then relaxed until dinner. There was roast pork for dinner and it was really tender and tasty. It's the first time we have had it here.

The roast pork was delicious.

The roast pork was delicious.

After dinner we went downstairs to the bar for our free drinks. This time we managed to go when it was open. There's so much more time when we aren't always swimming.

Peter in the bar.

Peter in the bar.

Us in the bar.

Us in the bar.

Painting In the bar.

Painting In the bar.

Again I took the easy option of resting at night. I want to get well, before I go to Britain, so am taking it easy. I took some night time shots from our bedroom window then went to sleep.

Nighttime shot from our window.

Nighttime shot from our window.

Next day was the usual: breakfast, pack and travel back to Hong Kong.

Posted by irenevt 03:48 Archived in Macau

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Comments

I love the wedding day pose, the mosaic staircase is gorgeous and I’m glad that Peter is back to beer though he does look very James Bond with his cocktails!
Xx

by Catherine

Haha, I'll let him know you think he looks like 007.

by irenevt

Loved the mosaic staircase and the colonial houses. The view from your room is spectacular at night. Oddly, we ate at a Pinocchio Restaurant in Veules-les-Roses in Normandy. It was the only place open on a very stormy day. Fortunately it was warm, dry and the food was very good.

You're right. You are easily led astray. It makes your blog so much more interesting.

by Beausoleil

Haha, Taipa was actually much more beautiful than I was expecting it to be.

by irenevt

I love trees, looks like an amazing outing. You certainly know how to find those interesting places! :)

by Ils1976

Hi Ils, although Macau is small there's certainly plenty to see there.

by irenevt

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